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Sofia Crespi

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Sofia Crespi

Post-Doc in Cognitive Science, Institute of Neuroscience (CNR-PISA)

Contacts

  • Email: crespi.sofiaallegra (AT) gmail.com
  • Telephone:¬† +39 050 3153185

Research laboratories

  • CNR Institute of Neuroscience, Pisa
  • Department of Psychology, Universit√† Vita-Salute, San Raffaele

Current research and interests

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Spatial Vision

Publications

2011

Crespi, S., Biagi, L., d'Avossa, G., Burr, D. C., Tosetti, M. & Morrone, M. C. (2011). Spatiotopic Coding of BOLD Signal in Human Visual Cortex Depends on Spatial Attention,PLoS One, 7 (6), e21661. PDF

The neural substrate of the phenomenological experience of a stable visual world remains obscure. One possible mechanism would be to construct spatiotopic neural maps where the response is selective to the position of the stimulus in external space, rather than to retinal eccentricities, but evidence for these maps has been inconsistent. Here we show, with fMRI, that when human subjects perform concomitantly a demanding attentive task on stimuli displayed at the fovea, BOLD responses evoked by moving stimuli irrelevant to the task were mostly tuned in retinotopic coordinates. However, under more unconstrained conditions, where subjects could attend easily to the motion stimuli, BOLD responses were tuned not in retinal but in external coordinates (spatiotopic selectivity) in many visual areas, including MT, MST, LO and V6, agreeing with our previous fMRI study. These results indicate that spatial attention may play an important role in mediating spatiotopic selectivity.

2010

2009

2008

2007

d'Avossa, G., Tosetti, M., Crespi, S., Biagi, L., Burr, D. C. & Morrone, M. C. (2007). Spatiotopic selectivity of BOLD responses to visual motion in human area MT,Nat Neurosci, 2 (10), 249-255. PDF

Many neurons in the monkey visual extrastriate cortex have receptive fields that are affected by gaze direction. In humans, psychophysical studies suggest that motion signals may be encoded in a spatiotopic fashion. Here we use functional magnetic resonance imaging to study spatial selectivity in the human middle temporal cortex (area MT or V5), an area that is clearly implicated in motion perception. The results show that the response of MT is modulated by gaze direction, generating a spatial selectivity based on screen rather than retinal coordinates. This area could be the neurophysiological substrate of the spatiotopic representation of motion signals.

2006


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